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Emily Scarratt

Watching wildlife in your garden

Posted by British Bird Food 06/06/2013 0 Comment(s)
Presumably you are interested in watching wildlife - otherwise you wouldn't be reading this! but to take it a stage further, how to get interested and make watching wildlife fun and informative, well, that's the thing that puts a lot of people off. Whether you know a little or if you are an expert, there is always someone who will benefit from your knowledge. Children especially, will love to learn from an adult about what is going on under their noses. So, to get started. Take a little time to get to know your local environment closer. Sit a while in a corner, very still and quietly. Look and listen intently, you will see movement in a very short while, now, what is it? and what is it doing? Once you have established a place to sit and observe, you might start to see a variety of wildlife close around you, do you need help to see it? a magnifying glass? or binoculars? these are things which you can purchase to help you see better, but what if you haven't got anything to look at - then you need to think about how to attract things into your space and of course this is a massive task, so break it down into sections and take it one blog at a time! Attracting wild birds into your garden. There is no need to transform your garden into a sanctuary to birds. Just make a few minor adjustments and additions and you will find it makes the world of difference to what is calling in to see you. Put up a wild bird feeder, this can be a low cost one hung from the fence, or you can buy a complete feeding station. The important thing is what wild bird food you put into it and where you site the feeder. What type of bird seed to use. Garden birds are looking for energy, they only weigh a few grammes, so they need to replenish their energy levels frequently and the more energy the food contains the better they can survive. Peanuts, Sunflower Hearts, Safflower seeds are all high in oil content and fibre. Suet pellets are made from fat and so have massive energy content. Mealworms are high in protein. So if you can get a mix of all of these ingredients then the birds will have a balanced diet and keep coming back to your feeder. Having identified the best mix of ingredients, you have a couple of choices on how you want to proceed. You can buy the ingredients separately and mix them yourself or you can buy a ready mixed bag of bird food. Visit our on line shop to see the range of wild bird food you can buy. Once you have your bird feeder filled and ready to go, the most important thing to do is to place it in the best position. Away from noise, predators and close to cover (like a bush or hedge). Now sit back and wait, and you will soon see the birds coming into feed. You can influence the type of bird by the type of wild bird food you use. Niger seed will attract Finches, but it does need it's own special feeder (we sell a tester feeder to see if it will bring in the finches). Whole peanuts will attract Woodpeckers, Nuthatches and Blue Tits, they too need their own (mesh) feeder. So you may well end up with three feeders hanging from your feeder station. Next (and not least) is clean water needs to be presented in a dish so they can drink or bathe. For the longer term, plant some pretty wild flowers close to your bird feeding station, this will attract insects as well as the birds. If you have room in your garden, leave an area to go wild, don't cut the grass in the area and plant some flowers around it. Collect a wood pile in the wild area, leave a piece of tin or wood on the ground and a couple of rocks, leave it alone for a year or so, then go back and look what you are helping find a habitat - you may be surprised how much wildlife you can support in your own garden, but more on that in the next blogs. mealworms for birdspeanuts for wild birdsGoldfinch food

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