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Emily Scarratt

Nesting material in your garden

Posted by British Bird Food 20/05/2013 0 Comment(s)
The birds in your garden are very busy at the moment, some are preparing their first nest of the season others are on the second. All of them need nesting materials to construct and maintain their nests and linings for the next brood of chicks. Our small terrier provides lots of fur for the garden birds to take so we don't need to look too hard for other materials, but if you don't have a dog to provide fur, then there are lots of other materials the birds will use. Moss from the lawn - in our case this is abundant! - they will use moss to line the nest, just scarify the lawn a little and pick up the moss. Cotton wool, wool cut to 1" lengths, but it is best not to leave string or cotton as the birds will possibly get their feet caught in it when they link it in to their nest structure. Presenting nesting material for wild birds is an easy thing to do, you can put it out on a table, or with your feeders. We tend to put it in a suet ball feeder, or an old plastic peanut feeder. The birds are happy to take it from wherever you leave it. It is also a good thing to contain the material, as when the birds come and get it you get to watch them take it back to where they are nesting, it is quite easy to spend a little time viewing the birds and you will soon see the direction they take the material, then you can find the nest. Be careful not to disturb the birds when they are on the nest, once they have laid there eggs, they are very sensitive to disturbance so it is best to watch from a safe distance. Or you might like to use a nest box with a camera in it or maybe a time lapse camera fitted to a nearby branch and you will be able to see every detail close up.

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